Style Court

Textiles, Art History, Gardens, and a Little Mental Traveling with Courtney Barnes 2006-2016

4.20.2009

Southern Cosmopolitan II



Last year when I put together that little Southern Cosmopolitan blog post about gallery owner Timothy Tew, I had no idea Susan Sully was working on a terrific book with a similar title. Recently released, Sully's The Southern Cosmopolitan: Sophisticated Southern Style is now a favorite nestled among older editions on my overcrowded, sagging bookshelf.

Some of my most admired designers are covered: Sully looks at the pied-à-terre of Thomas Jayne and Rick Ellis as well as Amelia Handegan's Charleston house. If you want to see dynamic yet sophisticated color deftly handled, study Handegan's work. It's especially nice to get a glimpse of her own home because she seems to have the freedom to push the envelope a bit further here.

Sully describes Handegan's aesthetic as akin to bricolage -- a word that once referred to the African tribal practice of creatively mixing found objects. South Carolina-based Handegan is a master at juxtaposing refined European, Far Eastern and West Indian pieces with humble, natural elements. The first four images at the top offer a peek. One of her most cherished possessions is a cluster of antique Thai bowls discovered at the bottom of the ocean -- part of a shipwreck -- attached permanently to fingers of natural coral. (Click the first picture to see the details.)

BTW: The wonderful writer Jamey Hatley (she's currently published in Oxford American) mentioned something to me about a book signing at Nadine Blake, so if you are in New Orleans contact the shop for details. Sully is also scheduled to speak at the New Orleans Museum of Art on Sunday, April 26, at 2 p.m., with a book signing to follow. And don't miss Amelia Handegan's updated website.

All images above © Southern Cosmopolitan: Sophisticated Southern Style by Susan Sully, Rizzoli New York, 2009.

The interior on the cover is the work of Hal Williamson; The toile-covered chair, also by Williamson, is from the same townhouse, Debra Shriver's, in NOLA's French Quarter and the toile itself was designed by Roulhac Toledano.


Related past post: Shipwreck Porcelain.

Read about how Thomas entertains here.

15 comments:

Anonymous said...

I own this book...it's fantastic and oh so southern. love it!

Rose C'est La Vie said...

What an absolutely gorgeous post, thank you. I'm going to order this book right away. The bowls with accretions of coral are extraordinary and I want those pink walls too!

Style Court said...

Anon and Rose -- So glad you are enthusiastic about this new book too. My post doesn't really do it justice. It really is interesting!

And Amleia's updated site is just great.

pve design said...

I love the word "bricolage" and use it quite often, part of being resilient is exactly that of a bricoleur. Keeping busy, tinkering, "fixin" and arranging things to a certain level of sophistication is so European as well as Southern. Lovely images.
pve

Style Court said...

Patricia -- I love your usage. A bricoleur. That's going to be my new word.

Stacy McCallum said...

thank you for the book intro. will have to point it out for Mother's Day! Love, love, love that chair!!

Style Court said...

It looks like you Stacy!

Kelly@ColorSizzle said...

Love the pink dining room! What a nice feminine and elegant place to have a tea party.

Mrs. Blandings said...

This is a beauty and now tops the list. Southern Cosmopolitan is a fitting nick name for you as well.

Style Court said...

Kelly, it's a surprise in a dining room, isn't it?

:)

Style Court said...

Patricia, I think you'll enjoy it. And thanks. Wish I'd thought of it three years ago.

le style et la matière said...

Great book -- I'll have to get it.
And the toile de jouy print of Jackson Square! I'd love to get some of that, too. Would you happen to know who makes it?

Style Court said...

Hi Le Style --

The book says the toile was designed by Roulhac Toledano.

le style et la matière said...

Thanks!

Style Court said...

my pleasure. here is a link

http://www.architextiles.com/books.htm