Style Court

Textiles, Art History, Gardens, and a Little Mental Traveling with Courtney Barnes 2006-2016

4.15.2008

Collectors Not Decorators


If you've read Angele Parlange's book, Creole Thrift, you've probably enjoyed hearing about her weekend-in-the-country adventures with Mish, when they hunt for antiques not game. Now the May Elle Decor offers us a nice peek into jewelry designer Mish's charming rustic-meets-chic home (although, if I've been paying attention, it's not the same Northeastern residence Parlange mentions).


For me, one of the best quotes from the May issue comes from Mish, the former in-house jewelry expert at Sotheby's; he says, "We are collectors at heart, not decorators...the house is furnished with lots of things from previous lives."

These autobiographical interiors, like the one shown top, usually contain disparate pieces that defy logic by working together. (Look at those topaz-covered Louis XV-style chairs mixed with the informal red striped sofa and oriental rug.) And Elle Decor always seems to hunt down the most sophisticated examples.

Elle Decor photography by William Waldron. Middle image from Town & Country, April 2008. Bamboo cuffs by Mish.

5 comments:

Mrs. Blandings said...

The Mish house was a favorite in this, a very fine, issue. His jewelry is on my wish list as well. I admired how all the stuff he and his partner loved came together so nicely.

balsamfir said...

I love your term "autobiographical interiors". They're my favorite kind, and even/particularly when its textiles(as in your favorite paris apartment) their individuality is what makes them so terrific. Just a lightbulb of a phrase.

Style Court said...

oh balsamfir, thanks. Great observations. As for the autobiographical description, I think I got it from charlotte moss :)

Karen at Junking in Georgia said...

Mish's comment about collecting things from past lives.. is wonderful. It captures what is so appealing about vintage items.. new things can sing but often seem to lack a soul

Style Court said...

Edith Wharton may have been among the first to use those words, "autobiographical interiors"