Style Court

Textiles, Art History, Gardens, and a Little Mental Traveling with Courtney Barnes 2006-2016

3.10.2008

Old Pieces, New Ideas




On the Parlange family property in Louisiana, there is a centuries-old building known as a pigeonnier, shown top. Designer Angele Parlange has transformed it into her own personal nest -- a place to land when visiting -- by covering antiques with contemporary John Robshaw textiles, below.



Recently I asked fellow Atlantan, design blogger and community arts volunteer, Brilliant Asylum, for her views on youthful Southern style. She said, "Having worked in New York, I have had the chance to recognize some of the qualities which makes the South unique in its style. A factor which stands out is the incorporation of family antiques into the design scheme. A young Southerner inherits a family heirloom, but may use it in a way that would be shocking to her mother or grandmother. I think Chassie Post and Angele Parlange employ this brand of connecting well."






"They add their youthful, sometimes humorous perspective, while honoring their past. Rarely do you find a home in the South where at least part of the design has not been cultivated over generations. In New York, an "existing" piece may be shuffled into storage (or off to Sotheby's). In Atlanta, special antiques are worked with and around--no questions asked."


Kerry Moody, manager of the culinary antiques store Lucullus, is known for his love of antiques. I've always loved his acid green plates pictured above. Image from Southern Accents.

The butterfly-infused loft of domino's contributing style editor, (and Miles Redd's friend) Chassie Post, was featured in the magazine's February 2008 issue. Her first Tiffany-blue New York pad was decorated by Redd.

"Tiffany" apartment photographed by Oberto Gili for House Beautiful, March 2001.

All Parlange photography is from Creole Thrift. © William Waldron, Harper Collins, New York, 2006.

13 comments:

The Peak of Chic said...

I think Millie summed it up quite well! Also, even if we inherit something we're not crazy about, we would never get rid of it! We just find a way to make it fit in. I also think Carolyn Carr does an amazing job with mixing her family's antiques with contemporary art and furniture. I believe there are photos of her home on Brilliant Asylum. You've hit the nail on the head with these photos Courtney!

Style Court said...

Jennifer, you've also explained a little of how you do this with those early American antiques -- the family pieces :)

Thanks for the Carr reminder too.

Brilliant Asylum said...

Thanks Courtney! And I agree with The Peak of Chic. Carolyn Carr is definitely a part of the Old South/New Style club.

Anonymous said...

To be fair to New Yorkers, recognize that for many of us, space is at an absolute premium and the pieces we live with must be functional first--which not all family antiques are! As someone with pieces both in my apartment and in storage, I can attest to my sense of guilt when I cannot make a family treasure work. That's why I always try to incorporate the art and table-top pieces that I've inherited...

Style Court said...

Anon,

That's a strong point. Also, I don't think anyone intended to romanticize one region over the other. Clearly people of all types, all over the world value their family things.(And we all probably have inherited stuff we dislike too!)

Thanks for sharing.

Mrs. Blandings said...

You are so lucky to have these pieces pass down. I was just talking to one of our dealers the other day and she observed that so much of the furniture that midwesterners inherit is Victorian. So, not only do they not choose to keep it, they don't have that innate sense of antiques.

Alkemie said...

I'm a fan of Angele Parlange and love her fabrics. Great post!! And Creole Thrift is a great book.

Bayou Contessa said...

So nice to see your recognition of so much southern talent, Courtney.
Angele has such an inspirational way of weaving a tapestry of family pieces and chic vintage and new pieces. And a great personality to go with it!

Mélanie said...

GREAT POST !
very interesting to see your point of view of southern american

Style Court said...

Julie and Melanie,

Glad you liked this one :)

LallaLydia said...

I love the wall paper, but hate the giant butterfly...I feel like it just bangs you over the head with its wings to emphasize "hey! I'm a big butterfly!" I know this comment sounds really stupid but my triple shot espresso hasn't taken effect yet...Cheers!

Style Court said...

LL,

I don't think you are alone :) The first time the image was posted others felt like you. But I guess the gutsy butterfly is a big part of what makes the apartment uniquely Chassie.

Thanks for visiting!

Style Court said...

Afterthought on regional style: Sheila Bridges is from Pennsylvania, not the South, but her work is also a very interesting mix of past with present.