Style Court

Nine Years of Textiles, Art History, Gardens, and a Little Mental Traveling with Courtney Barnes

12.07.2009

Reader Request: Lambrequins

[Photography by Miguel Flores-Vianna. Below, a closer view.]

I've been receiving some emails about the "valance things," or lambrequins seen on the December cover of Elle Decor. (Yes, lambrequins. That is the correct term for these chic, very architectural treatments.)

Everyone probably realizes that Miles Redd decorated the apartment but I really recommend picking up a copy of the magazine, if you haven't already. Writer Mitchell Owens explains in detail that Redd brought in architects Dick Bories and James Shearron to transform the city apartment into something suggestive of a glamorous, yet oh-so-cozy, early-20th-century country house. The lambrequins are just one of many rarefied details that the team hammered out together. (You have to read about those red felt walls.)

Dick and James have more beautiful pictures to share, so hop over here to enjoy. If their names seem to ring a bell, you may remember reading about them over at The Peak of Chic, EEE, or Aesthete's Lament.

Update: 11.08.09

James was kind enough to share with me a straightforward description of lambrequins. He says the differences between a pelmet and a lambrequin, in the 21st century, involve mostly size and the addition or subtraction of curtains. A lambrequin is ususally accepted as an all encompassing element that wholly defines a window treatment in either fabric or carved wood and nothing additional hangs from it. See the comments below for more information.

12 comments:

Jane said...

Lambrequins. How divine. A bit moorish. And very architectural. Must buy that edition. xoxo

ArchitectDesign™ said...

Is there a difference between a Lambrequin and a pelmet? I love the term MUCH more than just plain old 'pelmet'!

Style Court said...

Stefan -- I want James to answer so I don't make a mistake. In the meantime I may hit the books. Stay tuned!

Stacy said...

Thank you for the extra info. These are amazing it would be neat to see someone do a budget version of something similar.

Laura Casey Interiors said...

Love the term. It's up there with ranunuculus.

Style Court said...

James explains that the difference between a Pelmet and a Lambrequin today is mostly size and the addition or subtraction of curtains.

The Lambrequin is ususally accepted as an all encompassing element that wholly defines a window treatment in either fabric or carved wood and nothing additional hangs from it.

But he notes that dictionaries may give a number of confusing historical definitions that will thoroughly confuse you.

A Pelmet is most always a horizontal rigid decorative architectural element generally seated above a window and is meant to have curtains hanging from it.

ArchitectDesign™ said...

thanks for the clarification! Next house tour I'm on maybe I'll be able to impress someone with that knowledge :-)

Karena said...

Ooh, so interesting! I love the look of these unique window treatments!

The Peak of Chic said...

Love this whole project! If you want to see another great example of a lambrequin, look back through your old issues of Southern Accents, perhaps from a year and a half ago? There was a young Virginia couple who moved to a fabulous house in London; the wife's dressing room had a gorgeous lambrequin framing the window.

Style Court said...

J -- great tip. Thanks!

Belle said...

Love this room - I am going to buy the issue as a result! This is a first, by the way.

Red felt walls sound deliciously cozy. How does the upkeep on them work? Vacuuming? Steaming?

I think a lambrequin is a great way to add a graphic punch to a room!

Anonymous said...

Just light vacuum once a year no steaming.