Style Court

Nine Years of Textiles, Art History, Gardens, and a Little Mental Traveling with Courtney Barnes

9.01.2009

Forever Pieces

Charleston-based interior designer Amelia Handegan cherishes her art and antiques and rarely ditches her things out of boredom, so it has been a pleasure to see the evolution of her home as it has been photographed over the years.

Shown at top, scenic wallpaper hung against a greenish-gold wall as seen in Southern Accents, mid-1990s. Next, the panels appear in the designer's bedroom, now against a warm cream, 2009. Her lowcountry house is featured in the magazine's farewell September-October issue. For Handegan fans it's a feature to file and keep forever. [Photography by Pieter Estersohn, story by Julie Cole Miller.]

As a follow up, I also want to note Dawn Cannon's dahlia story in the same issue. (My copy arrived late yesterday.) If you are interested in growing the flowers, her piece is filled with sources and tips.

Wallpaper enthusiasts will want to look out for Rizzoli's fall release of Wallpaper: A History of Style and Trends by Carolle Thibaut-Pomerantz. I was treated to a preview a few months ago and can report that the book is lavishly illustrated with comprehensive text from the author who is a respected expert on vintage and rare papers.

6 comments:

The Peak of Chic said...

So nice to see someone who keeps her possessions for many years; I think that's somewhat rare, unfortunately. Cannot wait for the Wallpaper book!

Karena said...

I have to admit that many of my favorite pieces have been in my homes for 25+ years! I add to update. Just found a gorgeous blue garden stool(oversize that serves as a table in front of two armless stuffed chairs! Birthday money present to myself!

Mrs. Blandings said...

Handegan is so good at those rooms with variations of the same color or tone. I admire it so, though can never seem to stick to it myself.

home before dark said...

I am so tired of this tossaway mentality. I like living with things that tell a story, that have history. Who wants to pass down a rubble of resin stuff? Living with imperfections, nicked with time and memory, creates a sense of belonging and security. At least for me!

little augury said...

This is an excellent post and one we should do more of- I did a post on a New Orleans redux, with many of the seriously good pieces this lady had. Also have been observing this in other designer's homes as well as my mother's for many years.G

Ideezine said...

The only thing constant is change. The only thing really timeless is classic pieces that we've invested in over the years.
We decide what goes in our homes and use publications for guide posts of artist adventure. Have fun feasting your eyes on all of it!

The wall paper book should be a great interior designer addition to my studio library.

Bette